Thursday, September 25, 2008

Multiple plumeria stems


You can see from the photo that there are several stems growing. This was the result of the end being accidentally damaged. Plumerias are actually pruned in a similar fashion. Pollarding is a pruning practice of pruning back each point on the stem. The end point is called the pollard head. Using this method increases the branches. If pruning is done in the dormant season the resulting stem could all develop flowers. Pruning done during the growing season will not produce flowering branches. When pruning, be aware that milky sap will flow. This sap may irritate the eyes and skin. Wear protective coverings on your hands. I like to garden without gloves to get the feel of the plant and dirt. With plumerias, I do wear gloves…I’m not stupid…

7 comments:

Val at The Illustrated Garden said...

Your photos are beautiful, and thanks to you I'm learning a lot about plumeria. Thanks also for visiting my blog!

Reader Wil said...

Your photo is great.You know a lot about plants.So plumerias are bad for the skin, well...be careful.

Thanks for visiting my blog. I write about Australia, but I live in the Netherlands/ Holland.

Virtual Voyage said...

Thanks for the visit - and I can return the compliment, your photos are beautiful. I'm a Brit, some stunning gardens over here thanks to the RHS.

Becky said...

What a beautiful plant! I've never seen those before.
And such helpful information.
Thanks for visiting my blog.

lily flax said...

Yes you are obcessed with plants, frangpanis are beautiful, will they grow in geelong, will they grow in a pot, good pictures, and very informative, in that vien I will have to put up detailed info about vegetables, botanical and the like, but fasinating blog keep up the good work

Linda Lunda said...

WOW!!! It´s variegated!!!
Linda

Linda Lunda said...

I WAAAAAAAANT IT!